Month: May 2016

New Beginnings (the end of Stanmore)

It’s been two weeks (I think!) since I gave my room key back to the Mercure reception and said goodbye to my new friends and goodbye to the room that had been my own little bit of heaven for the last three weeks.

I knew I wouldn’t be able to keep up with writing the blog during the three week programme, so I thought I’d give it some time and come back to the blog with a fresh perspective of the last few weeks…

The Pain Management & Rehabilitation programme run by Stanmore was an experience unlike any other. The first question the Psychologist asked me in my first one to one session was about my expectations. I had absolutely no idea what my expectations were because I knew so little about what the programme actually entailed. I’d had a brief powerpoint presentation at the pre-assessment and it was so vague I really didn’t know what to expect.

One thing in particular I didn’t expect, was to meet such an incredible group of women. There were 7 of us originally, but one lady left after the first night due to her being scheduled for surgery, so we were then down to 6 ladies (or patients, as they call us – which was strange as we were all staying in the hotel, rather than patients on a ward).

I have never met such an interesting, diverse and strong group of women in my life – the most amazing part of the course was spending time with a collective of women who all shared the same ‘secret’ – we’re all in pain.

Pain is such a funny topic. There isn’t a single person in the world who doesn’t know what pain feels like, yet there isn’t a single person in the world who knows what YOUR pain feels like – and that’s rather extraordinary, if you think about it.

Living in constant pain is horrible, it just is. But, when you meet other people who also live in constant pain, something happens. Personally, I found compassion (that I didn’t know I had) and empathy (again, another emotion I struggle to access) in bounds, not only coming from myself, but I also recognised it in them too. One grimace on my face and they knew instantly I was in pain. It’s a wonderfully comforting experience.

The programme ran from Monday morning to Friday afternoon for 3 consecutive weeks and all but one ‘session’ was based at the hotel. We were all given rooms close to the St Andrews and Cambridge suites that were used for the theory based seminars and the Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy sessions. We were all given timetables at the start of each week with all our sessions mapped out for the week ahead.

The first week started relatively slowly and then the second and third weeks were busier, as we’d become more accustomed to the routine of the programme.

There were a few issues with the programme, mainly to do with the hotel itself – the hotel pool (which we had access to during the whole programme) had heating problems and so we had to miss out on a couple of hydrotherapy sessions – 26 degrees wasn’t pleasant.

The other issue was with the kitchen – the programme is on a full board basis so all food was included, but the kitchen staff weren’t exactly happy (or knowledgeable enough) to deal with two of the ladies’ dietary requirements (gluten free / low FODMAP diet) and it was a traumatic event every night trying to get them fed.
I Β wasn’t too happy eating from one restaurant menu for the whole three weeks – there are only so many falafel burgers you can eat before you get sick of them and only so many portions of chips you can eat for lunch before you start to pile on the pounds!

The programme itself has been a huge help to me personally, although I had already set up a lot of my own coping mechanisms in the 10 years since I was diagnosed. For example, relaxation and meditation were already a large part of my life so I felt like a few times it was a bit of a ‘teaching a granny to suck eggs’ situation, especially during the ‘nutrition’ session, but I realise I’m probably in the minority and that a lot of people will really benefit from what the course has to offer.

The occupational therapy sessions were interesting but I wouldn’t say all that helpful for me personally. Firstly, I don’t cook (I hate cooking and I’m lucky that my partner cooks for us!) so there wasn’t much they could teach me in that respect. I can’t hold a pen or pencil so the mindful colouring session was a bit of a miss too, but some of the other ladies found it really helpful.

The first OT I had (we were given a different OT after the first week, which was great!) wanted to change my sleep routine but I was assertive in that I was happy with the routine I currently have and would rather focus on other potentially ‘unhealthier’ parts of my life to change.

I will stress that the buzzword for this programme would be ‘change’. I have no problems with change (I get bored easily) but there are some things I’m not willing to compromise on and sleep is one of them. I’m sitting here writing this blog at 2am and that’s just how I work; my creativity hits a peak at this time and that’s just how it is.
If I was to have a 9-5 job, my routine would change and I’d suck it up, but I cannot work and therefore I have the luxury of living to my own rhythm, not society’s. (End rant!)

Another big aspect of the programme is learning about pacing. You’ll hear the term ‘pacing’ a lot if you join chronic pain groups on social media, but hearing about it and then being taught how to do it, is another thing entirely!

Pacing is where you work out how much of an activity you can do, and then changing your position (or stretching, or changing how you carry out that activity) so that you interrupt the pain before it hits you. I had already started pacing some activities before I started the programme. For example, my partner carries a fold out stool with us when we go on holiday or go to a castle or historical house. I make sure I have something to sit on at regular (or sometimes random) intervals so that I don’t get exhausted too quickly. It means then, that I have more energy to do more/see more.

One thing about the programme I will rave about is the physiotherapy. Before starting the programme I was most excited to get the chance to work with aΒ physiotherapist who knows about Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome as I have had such terrible experiences with physio over the years. I was right to be excited, as the physio I was appointed was fantastic. She was so knowledgeable and personable and I felt really comfortable with her. We discussed my current problem areas (shoulder and lower/mid back) and my love for yoga and pilates (and how I struggle to exercise during a flare-up) and we created a yogalates routine I can do every day as my physio, which incorporates both my shoulder and back problems. I’ve been able to do my physio every day since finishing the programme (thanks to having Β an enjoyable physio routine and partner who reminds me to do them every day!)

It’s been two ish weeks since the programme finished and life has gone back to ‘normal’ – I am still struggling to pace some activities that I do most – like using my laptop and watching TV and DVDs on my laptop, but I’m sure in time and with practise, it’ll get easier.

The weirdest thing is not having the other ladies around. I say ladies, I mean friends. I truly feel honored and blessed to have been put on the programme with each and every single one of them.

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