learning

The Great Unease

One thing I have learnt over the past 10 years since being diagnosed with a life-altering illness, is that I am yet to feel at ease with my life. There comes a time in your life, when you hit the big THREE-O and you’re supposed to have your shit together.Β Well, I thought I had my shit together; turns out, I haven’t.

You see, I’ve always been an old soul. I’ve always known I wanted to settle down, get married and have pets (never children) and while it seems I am on track with my life goals, I am still feeling the great unease surrounding who I am and what I bring to the world.

Since I was a young teenager, I’ve always wanted to be famous somehow. I wanted to sing, but stagefright put paid to that dream – likewise with acting (for which I was awarded an ‘exceptional’ from my year 8 Drama teacher) and performance anxiety has shrouded my life in many ways.

I’ve always had the fear of being like everyone else. When I was at school I made it my plan to stick out like a sore thumb – and was bullied because of it. But I was stoic in that I didn’t want to fit in and be like everyone else, so I took it and it made me strong.

Yet here I am at the age of thirty, wanting, in part, to be like everyone else. Not, in the sense of I want to be in a job I dislike, pay rent to a greedy landlord and have children drive me round the bend, but in the sense that I want to be a productive member of society. (You have no idea how much I hate myself for saying that!)

Living with an incurable, oftentimes debilitating illness means I am not a ‘productive’ member of society. I am unable to follow my career goals (of which I have had many, shot down in a blaze of smoke) and now I’m left with a sense of ‘now what?’

I felt so compelled by these feelings of unease that last year I enrolled onto a distance learning Degree in History and surprisingly to me, I’m doing very well on my first module (If I was studying at a brick uni, I would be at distinction level!) and I’m really enjoying spending time wisely, studying. I no longer felt like I was wasting away in my bedroom waiting for the weekend when I get to spend time with my partner of nearly 3 years.

However, I’m now nearing the end of my first module (of which there are 6 – one per year) and I’m finding myself twiddling my thumbs again. I’ve started the audiobook of the set book for my next module yet it doesn’t start until October.

People think being at home and ‘off work’ is a dream lifestyle. I won’t argue that it has its benefits – I can stay up as late as I want and wake up as late as I want, for example, but I’m also trapped inside 4 walls for 90% of my day and two thirds of the week. As an unworking woman, I do not have the funds to be galavanting around in a car (I can’t drive manual and cannot afford an automatic car) nor do I have the energy to do so.

I spend my days lying on my bed in various positions (shifting when the pain becomes too much to bear) and it’s demoralising. Seeing all those people on Instagram going places in life makes me feel uneasy. In the pit of my stomach I feel the longing to have a ‘normal life’ like all these people I watch every day.

But then, I have to remind myself, yet again, that I’m not normal. I do have an incurable illness and I will have it for the rest of my life. It’s really really hard to balance this unending feeling of disquiet in my soul, with the knowledge that I’m doing the best I can. I have an enquiring mind and I want to see the world – this is in complete competition with the fact that my body was not built the same way as my mind. My body is broken, but my mind is sharp.

How does one reconcile a life wanted, with the life given? How does one overcome the odds when they are all stacked against you? This is something my mind continues to wonder, while I lie here, in pain, day after day.

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Student, once again!

I can’t believe I haven’t written a blog post about the fact that I’m now a student (again!)

I am 5 weeks into a BA (Honours) History degree with the Open University and so far, it’s been great! I’m ahead in my studies and handed my first assignment (on Cleopatra and CΓ©zanne!) with 16 days to spare. I figure even if I’m way off the point, the second assignment is a second go at the first assignment so all’s not lost!

This is my desk at the moment (borrowed laptop, antique dining chair!) and it’s not overly comfortable. Having a condition like Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome means sitting is difficult, typing is painful and so is holding a book open! Thankfully the Open University have a great support team for disabled students and they sent me ring bound copies of the course texts so I don’t have to hold them open!

I’m also in the middle of applying for Disabled Student Allowance to hopefully get some dictation software, an ergonomic chair and some other things that will help me study more successfully while being disabled. 

Unfortunately I wasn’t able to attend the Day School as I haven’t been given any funding for travel yet (hoping that DSA will cover this) but I did make it to a local tutorial which was nerve wracking but really interesting. I actually found myself answering all the questions the other students directed at our Tutor so I’m feeling like I’ve absorbed all the necessary information!

I will be writing updates on my studies as this is something that may interest other disabled people who would like to study but don’t know where to start! 

If you have any questions about being a disabled student, please do feel free to get in touch, I’d be happy to answer your questions!