victorian

Victorian House Hunting!

I last wrote in March about how uneasy I was feeling about my life. It’s amazing how quickly things can change.

Tomorrow, I turn 31 and on Saturday I’m taking my other half to view a house that I’ve fallen in love with. It’s a beautiful (yet slightly dilapidated) Victorian Terrace in a village and is full of potential for our first home project.

I’ve written previously about my passion for history and my biggest obsession in life has been wanting to buy a Victorian house and restore its original features like fireplaces and open fires, sash windows and corbels etc.

Luckily for me, my partner in crime hates new build houses as much as I do, so we quickly agreed we wanted to buy a period property and do it up in the style we like. We settled on a Victorian terrace. My Grandparents owned a Victorian end-of-terrace in Liverpool and we visited them during my childhood. I can still remember the high ceilings, big rooms, beautiful wooden banister, the red carpet running up the stairs with stair rods, the stained glass porch and the bakelite light switches. From the age of around 8 I fell in love with that old, dilapidated house and I’ve been determined to own something so beautiful myself.

With that in mind, we started house hunting only a few months ago, and in the space of around 2 weeks we viewed 11 properties of varying states of undress (!). The first Victorian house we saw had a 200 foot garden, which had such amazing potential, especially for us, as we’re keen to get green fingered and I’m something of a Hedgewitch. Unfortunately, the house (or cottage!) itself was “compact and bijou”, in need of an awful lot of TLC and the kitchen was the smallest kitchen I’ve ever seen with the lowest ceiling I’ve ever seen! Suffice to say, we let someone else take a punt on that house!

Next came another Victorian terrace that had been refurbished upstairs but not downstairs so the 1970s kitchen was in desperate need of being ripped out and started again, with a more age-appropriate kitchen. The road it was on was unbelievably claustrophobic, so that was a no from me.

We then went to view 2 properties a few doors down from each other. Both were previous HMOs (houses in multiple occupation) and were damp as f*ck. There’s no way we could afford to sort out the damp and have enough money to make the house liveable in. So they were instant nos.

It’s actually incredible how fast you learn when you’re thrown into the deep end of a project. I’ve never lived anywhere other than in my parents council house – it’s a terraced house built in the mid to late 70s and structurally, we don’t do any maintenance to it as it’s not our responsibility. So, looking at Victorian buildings with absolutely no experience in home owning/building has been a very steep learning curve already.
I’ve spent many hours researching how to renovate old buildings, and together, we have built quite an arsenal of knowledge over the past couple of months. I’m actually rather proud of myself – I’ve spoken to mortgage advisors, estate agents and the like, and I’d never done anything so grown up in my life. I definitely feel like I’ve achieved so much personally, already.

Knowing what we know, we’ve narrowed down our search radius to two areas of a town we want to live in. We’ve excluded ‘rougher’ areas from our search as we’re in the mind of buying a ‘shit house, in a decent area’ and making it nice. Postcode means a lot to us.

I have to say, I have, at this stage, fallen in love with a house. It’s everything I want (even if the garden is a little smaller than I’d like, it has potential to be really cute) and I can really imagine us living there together, as a family. I can already see what I could physically add to the house (stripping and painting architraves for example) and I can see the wallpaper I’ve chosen on the walls and the fireplaces opened up and restored with open fireplaces and wood burning stoves. It’s in a beautiful village on a beautiful street of Victorian terraces that all look loved and cared for…

The Big But…

Unfortunately for us, I can say with absolute certainty that this ‘dream house’ is also going to be the ‘dream house’ for many other house hunters. The house is for up for informal tender – this means that you view the house, then you write a ‘sealed bid’ – hand your sealed, secret offer into the estate agent for the vendor to then decide who they want to sell the house to. It’s a fair way of doing it, but still absolutely heartbreaking if our bid isn’t successful.

I know I shouldn’t put all my eggs into this one basket, but when you fall in love, you can’t stop it, you just have to go for it. So, we’re going for it. We have our deposit, our mortgage in principle and I’m so ready to start my new life with my incredible partner in crime.

I just hope with all I have, that this is the house for us. I’ll keep you posted x

*Disclaimer: Featured image subject to Copyright – the Victorian Emporium*

Stuff… So much stuff!

I’ve previously posted about how my partner and I are currently saving for a deposit on a house. In the meantime, I’ve decided to rid myself of all the horrible, tacky Ikea furniture I have (tallboy chest of drawers and a wardrobe) in favour of some real, antique non-flat pack furniture.

We’ve decided on the Victorian era with regards to wardrobes and chests of drawers and gothic revival slash arts and crafts for our bed and other items of furniture (jardiniere stands and such) and we’re now scouring the country for bits of furniture we can actually afford.

Unfortunately for me, I currently live in a terraced 3 bed house built in the 1970s so it isn’t blessed with the Victorian treatment in ceiling height and room size. I’ve just found out that the tall boy chest of drawers I’ve fallen in love with won’t in fact,  fit up the stairs in my parents house where I’m currently residing (we can tell by looking, even without the Ross from Friends’ “PIVOT…. PIVOT…..”)

To say I’m gutted would be an understatement.

So, it’s back to the drawing board and I’m now left with a large hole where my hideous Ikea chest of drawers sat until 2 days ago when I sold them on a facebook group to a very happy lady. If I could find a Scottish Victorian chest of drawers that will fit up the stairs and round a corner, you’ll be the first to know!

Planning for the future also puts into question your past. At least, in my case, my past that is currently sat in multiple vintage suitcases on top of (previously stated) hideous Ikea wardrobe. I have collections of CDs from when I was 17 and a member of the band HIM’s street team; I have all the Ozzy and Sabbath CDs I collected in my youth, I have memories in the form of STUFF – so much stuff and so many memories.

But what do you do with all those memories? My loft (or rather, my parents’ loft, which I have temporarily commandeered) is chock full of memories too – my rail of 1940s and 1950s clothing that I will never get rid of, 1950s furniture that I loved and now hate and can’t shift, suitcases full of winter clothes/summer clothes depending on the season and even more mementos all tucked up in various sized boxes…

You know the things… the keyrings you bought on a trip to the seaside with your best mate from high school, and the coat you wore at your fattest (yes, I do still have my ‘fat coat’) and the clothing you used to wear but don’t so much any more, but still won’t throw out because you might some day…

I’m now facing a rather hard decision about what will go and what will stay. I simply cannot keep it all, I simply don’t have the room.

How do you know which mementos to keep and which ones to throw away?

 

 

The house we don’t have yet. 

My partner and I have been planning on living together from around 4 months of being together. We decided very early on that we were serious about each other and from then on, we’ve been collecting things for the house we don’t have yet. 

To say we’re an unusual couple would be a slight understatement. I am what most people would call a ‘goth’ or ‘greebo’ and my boyfriend also has an alternative look; long blonde hair, beard and rarely without a metal tshirt on. 

Living as a couple has been our plan pretty much from the start and it’s been a wonderful experience over the past two years collecting things for our home to be. We both decided that we didn’t want a flat-packed home from IKEA or Argos. We are passionate about old things, antique furniture and things that have held the test of time. 

We bought a gothic revival Victorian octagonal table and drove many many miles to the Peak District to pick it up. We bought a beautiful black Victorian dresser from a man whose wife wanted more modern furniture (thank you very much!) and we have a writing desk and wall mirror to match. 

Our latest purchases were a French ecclesiastical antique candle stick and a wonderful planter that I’m now looking for a stand to put it on! 


We’re definitely going down the Victorian route with our decor. Think, dark coloured walls, dark furniture and lots of candlesticks. I’ve been obsessed with taxidermy and curios since childhood so it was a huge relief to have a partner who also doesn’t hate my love for the macabre. 

At the moment, because of the planter we’ve just found, I’m in the middle of researching which house plants I’m least likely to kill and which house plants were most popular during the Victorian times. I’ve settled on a Boston Fern for the planter above. I love ferns. 

Here are some more images of things we’ve bought for The House We Don’t Have Yet.